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Rack Schirmständer Aufbewahrung Schönbuch
223,31 € *
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Runder oder eckiger Schirmständer umgedreht auch als Beistelltischchen verwendbar. Aus quadratischem Metallrohr (1 cm x 1 cm) fest verschweißt. Passend zu Garderobenständer Rack. Filigran und funktional. Der Schirmständer RACK ist aus quadratischem Metallrohr. Es gibt den Schirmständer in eckiger sowie in runder Form und jeweils in verschiedenen Ausführungen. Die Schirmständer mit weißer oder schwarzer Pulverbeschichtung können umgedreht zu Beistelltischen werden und als praktische Ablage dienen. Das Modell in glänzend verchromter Ausführung (mit Gummimatte) ist ausschließlich als Schirmständer zu nutzen. Klares Design für viele Verwendungszwecke – ob im privaten Eingangsbereich oder in Büros Shops Praxis- und Verkaufsräumen. Minimalismus Design und Funktion. Der Schirmständer aus der Linie RACK ist aus quadratischem Metallrohr. Es gibt den Schirmständer in eckiger sowie in runder Form und jeweils in verschiedenen Ausführungen. Die Modelle in weißer oder schwarzer Pulverbeschichtung können umgedreht zu Beistelltischen werden und als praktische Ablage dienen. Der Schirmständer in glänzend verchromter Ausführung ist ausschließlich als Schirmständer zu nutzen. Filigran und funktional.Neue Räume schaffen - das gelingt f/p design Fritz Frenkler und Anette Ponholzer mit ihren Kreationen auf einzigartige Weise. Die beiden Designer gründen im Jahr 2000 die f/p design deutschland gmbh und 2003 f/p design japan inc. In den vorangegangenen Jahren arbeitet Fritz Frenkler als Geschäftsführer von frogdesign Asien leitet die wiege Wilkhahn Entwicklungsgesellschaft und ist Designchef der Deutschen Bahn AG. Seit 2006 ist der kreative Allrounder zudem Professor für Industrial Design an der Technischen Universität München. Anette Ponholzer arbeitet nach ihrem Diplom in Industrial Design zunächst in New York bevor sie ebenfalls für die wiege Wilkhahn Entwicklungsgesellschaft tätig ist. 2007 lehrt die Designerin als Gastprofessorin im Fachbereich Innenarchitektur an der Hochschule für Technik in Stuttgart. Die von f/p gestaltete Produktpalette reicht von Möbeln über Leuchten bis zu Haus- Audio/Video- und Kommunikationsgeräten. Außerdem entwirft f/p design Ladenbausysteme und Messestände. Das Designbüro verfügt mit Kunden aus Asien Europa und den USA über internationale Kompetenz und erhält zahlreiche Auszeichnungen. Die Kreationen von f/p design für Schönbuch sind CABIN der Schrank nach Maß die filigranen Garderobenlinien SKID und RACK sowie der minimalistische Garderobenständer LEFT.

Anbieter: designwebstore
Stand: 10.07.2020
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Intimate Bondage: The Kate Dawson Thrillers, Bo...
9,95 € *
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Someone has a fetish for murder.Detective Kate Dawson is willing to go undercover to catch a serial killer. But this time, undercover may be exactly what the killer wants.Two very rich and powerful men in San Francisco have been murdered by a mysterious woman, nicknamed “The Angel of Death” by the press. Stephen Collins is targeted as the third victim. Naked, Collins welcomes a red-headed woman, dressed as a dominatrix, into his Pacific Heights home, and together they engage in sadomasochistic play. The play turns deadly when she produces a blade, hidden in the handle of her whip, and slashes Collins’ throat.When this rich, politically-connected CEO is found murdered - shackled in his own private dungeon - on a foggy San Francisco morning, Detective Kate Dawson and her partner, Frank Miller, are assigned the case. Dawson was once an up-and-coming star of the San Francisco police department, but her daughter’s senseless death with Kate’s own service revolver put her on a downward spiral. Now, she sees the murder investigation as a chance to redeem herself. Miller, an African American who is a few weeks short of retirement, is looking for one last, big win. Their only lead is a provocative email from “Crystal Rose” with an IP address at the University of San Francisco. Before long, Kate's on the trail of a serial killer who uses the seedy underworld of porn shops, internet sex sites, and S&M clubs to target victims. She knows the only way to catch the killer is to become part of that world. Her investigation is further complicated by a psychology professor with a penchant for playing mind games. John Flynn is the three-time, Hugo-nominated author of the Kate Dawson thrillers, a series about a good but tormented cop who walks the dark side and knows its shadows all too well. The other books in the series include The Architects of Armageddon, Murder on Air Force One, Terror at G-20, and Merchants of Death 1. Language: English. Narrator: Chaz Allen. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/162542/bk_acx0_162542_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 10.07.2020
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After the Music Stopped
13,06 € *
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New York Times Bestseller One of our wisest and most clear-eyed economic thinkers offers a masterful narrative of the crisis and its lessons. Many fine books on the financial crisis were first drafts of history-books written to fill the need for immediate understanding. Alan S. Blinder, esteemed Princeton professor, Wall Street Journal columnist, and former vice chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, held off, taking the time to understand the crisis and to think his way through to a truly comprehensive and coherent narrative of how the worst economic crisis in postwar American history happened, what the government did to fight it, and what we can do from here-mired as we still are in its wreckage. With bracing clarity, Blinder shows us how the U.S. financial system, which had grown far too complex for its own good-and too unregulated for the public good-experienced a perfect storm beginning in 2007. Things started unraveling when the much-chronicled housing bubble burst, but the ensuing implosion of what Blinder calls the "bond bubble" was larger and more devastating. Some people think of the financial industry as a sideshow with little relevance to the real economy-where the jobs, factories, and shops are. But finance is more like the circulatory system of the economic body: if the blood stops flowing, the body goes into cardiac arrest. When America's financial structure crumbled, the damage proved to be not only deep, but wide. It took the crisis for the world to discover, to its horror, just how truly interconnected-and fragile-the global financial system is. Some observers argue that large global forces were the major culprits of the crisis. Blinder disagrees, arguing that the problem started in the U.S. and was pushed abroad, as complex, opaque, and overrated investment products were exported to a hungry world, which was nearly poisoned by them. The second part of the story explains how American and international government intervention kept us from a total meltdown. Many of the U.S. government's actions, particularly the Fed's, were previously unimaginable. And to an amazing-and certainly misunderstood-extent, they worked. The worst did not happen. Blinder offers clear-eyed answers to the questions still before us, even if some of the choices ahead are as divisive as they are unavoidable. After the Music Stopped is an essential history that we cannot afford to forget, because one thing history teaches is that it will happen again.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 10.07.2020
Zum Angebot
After the Music Stopped
13,06 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

New York Times Bestseller One of our wisest and most clear-eyed economic thinkers offers a masterful narrative of the crisis and its lessons. Many fine books on the financial crisis were first drafts of history-books written to fill the need for immediate understanding. Alan S. Blinder, esteemed Princeton professor, Wall Street Journal columnist, and former vice chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, held off, taking the time to understand the crisis and to think his way through to a truly comprehensive and coherent narrative of how the worst economic crisis in postwar American history happened, what the government did to fight it, and what we can do from here-mired as we still are in its wreckage. With bracing clarity, Blinder shows us how the U.S. financial system, which had grown far too complex for its own good-and too unregulated for the public good-experienced a perfect storm beginning in 2007. Things started unraveling when the much-chronicled housing bubble burst, but the ensuing implosion of what Blinder calls the "bond bubble" was larger and more devastating. Some people think of the financial industry as a sideshow with little relevance to the real economy-where the jobs, factories, and shops are. But finance is more like the circulatory system of the economic body: if the blood stops flowing, the body goes into cardiac arrest. When America's financial structure crumbled, the damage proved to be not only deep, but wide. It took the crisis for the world to discover, to its horror, just how truly interconnected-and fragile-the global financial system is. Some observers argue that large global forces were the major culprits of the crisis. Blinder disagrees, arguing that the problem started in the U.S. and was pushed abroad, as complex, opaque, and overrated investment products were exported to a hungry world, which was nearly poisoned by them. The second part of the story explains how American and international government intervention kept us from a total meltdown. Many of the U.S. government's actions, particularly the Fed's, were previously unimaginable. And to an amazing-and certainly misunderstood-extent, they worked. The worst did not happen. Blinder offers clear-eyed answers to the questions still before us, even if some of the choices ahead are as divisive as they are unavoidable. After the Music Stopped is an essential history that we cannot afford to forget, because one thing history teaches is that it will happen again.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 10.07.2020
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Laws of Form
24,99 € *
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Laws of Form by G Spencer-Brown new English edition: At last this all-time classic has been reset, allowing more detailed explanations and fresh insight. There are seven appendices, doubling the size of the original book.This new edition of G Spencer-Browns all-time classic comes with previously unreleased work on prime numbers as well as on the four-colour theorem.Most exiting of all is the first ever proof of the famous Riemann hypothesis. To have, in print, under your hands and before your own eyes, what defied the best minds for a century and a half, is an experience not to be denied.Preface to the new English editionAs is now well known, Laws of Form took ten years from its inception to its publication, four years to write it and six years of political intrigue to get it published.Typically of all unheralded best sellers from relatively obscure authors, it was turned down by six publishers, including Mark Longman who published my earlier work on probability. Even Sir Stanley Unwin refused to publish it until his best author, Bertrand Russell, told him he must.This crucial recommendation was not achieved without intrigue, and required me (not unwillingly) to sleep with one of Russell’s granddaughters, who asked me in the morning, ‘What exactly do you want from Bertie?’‘To endorse what he said about the book when he first read it in typescript,’ I told her.‘He never will!’ she exclaimed. ‘You’ll have to twist his arm, you’ll have to blackmail him. How can I help?’The next few years were spent in vigorous arm-twisting and incessant blackmail from us both. One of her threats was to invite me to Plas Penrhyn as her guest while Bertie and Edith were away in London. This sent Bertie into a paroxysm of terror of what the neighbours might think. He also had an irrational fear of spoiling his reputation as a mathematician, which was not good anyway, by recommending a book that had not yet been tried by the critics. He seemed totally unaware that any book he recommended, however ridiculous, would have no effect whatever on this.When we finally got him cornered, in my next visit to Plas Penrhyn, he carefully avoided mentioning the subject during the whole of my stay, and I considered it too dangerous to mention it myself. The next morning I was due to depart while Bertie and Edith were still in bed, and I thought I had failed miserably. But no! I missed my train because they had not ordered me a taxi to the station, which was their way of telling me that my visit was to be prolonged by another day.The evening of this extra day came, and still nothing was mentioned. Ten o’ clock bedtime arrived, and I thought I had failed again, when Bertie suddenly said, ‘What exactly do you want of me?’‘To endorse what you said about the book three years ago,’ I told him.‘You must remind me what it was,’ he said.I produced a verbatim report of his remarks, neatly typed out, and thrust it in his face.‘Are you sure this is all you want?’ he said. ‘Don’t you want me to write a detailed introduction to the work, as I did for Wittgenstein?’I told him that that would be very nice, but that this was all I needed just now.He contemplated the page of typescript for a moment, and then a wicked gleam lit up his face, and he rubbed his hands.‘Supposing I don’t?’ he grinned.‘Then,’ I heard myself saying, ‘it might delay the publication for a year or so, but the book will still be published in the end, and you won’t be associated with it.’‘Oh,’ he said. ‘I never thought of that. How would you like me to sign it?’There is no stronger mathematical law than the law of complementarity. A thing is defined by its complement, i.e. by what it is not. And its complement is defined by its uncomplement, i.e. by the thing itself, but this time thought of differently, as having got outside of itself to view itself as an object, i.e. ‘objectively’, and then gone back into itself to see itself as the subject of its object, i.e. ‘subjectively’ again.Thus we are what we see, although what we see looks like (and is) what we are not.This incessant crossing of the thing boundary, to look at it from one side and then the other, is called scrutiny, which as a small child was I told is not polite, because by scrutinizing a person or thing we shall notice uncomplimentary (same sound, different word) qualities of the person or thing that it is rude to mention or think about.At the age of three I discovered that most people, from what they told me, could stop themselves from thinking these rude thoughts, which is I suspect why ordinary people do not usually do mathematics, where you have to repeatedly cross and recross the thing boundary. In fact Laws of Form is the book I wrote simply about doing just this and nothing else.When the book finally came out, in 1969 April 17, its effect was sensational. The Whole Earth Catalog ordered 500 copies, which was half the edition, and other big dealers followed suit. The first printing was sold out before it reached the shops, and the publisher had to order a hurried reprint to meet the demand.Nobody had seen anything like it. Here was an upstart author explaining the mysteries of mathematics that the so-called greats of the science in the last 8000 years (at least) had never noticed, and in language that a child of six could follow.Having achieved my life’s ambition of composing and publishing a nearly perfect work of literature by the age of 46, I was suddenly confronted by the problem of what to do with the rest of my life. I knew, and so did everybody else, that I could never top this achievement, so with what significant purpose could I carry on?One thing I could and did do was learn some mathematics. One of many reasons why the book is so famous is because I did not know any math, apart from school stuff, when I began to write it. I had to teach myself, and with me, my readers, as I went along. In ten years I had learned enough to become a full professor in the University of Maryland, although I still thought I knew very little. Math is almost impossible to master without personal tuition, and I was lucky to strike up friendships with D H Lehmer and J C P Miller, both, as it happened, experts on Riemann’s hypothesis, in which I had no interest whatever, nor in analytic number theory in general. It was only on being told by my former student James Flagg, who is the best-informed scholar of mathematics in the world, that I had in effect proved Riemann’s hypothesis in Appendix 7, and again in Appendix 8, that persuaded me to think I had better learn something about it.I am an intensely competitive person, which comes from being repeatedly told by my mother that I would never be any good. This forced me to spend my whole life attempting to prove her wrong. The tragedy of it is that however brilliantly I performed, it made no difference. Nothing I could do would change her mind. I beat her at chess when I was four, and all she did was refuse to play with me ever again, rather than admit that I was good.If you solve a famous unsolved problem by mistake it doesn’t count. You have to say ‘I am going to solve this problem,’ and then solve it. So I had to spend another ten years learning analytic number theory, which I hated, in order to secure and objectify what I had done, and make it presentable.The result is so fascinating that it made the effort seem almost worth while, and the problem was so difficult that solving it gave me nearly as much pleasure as writing Laws of Form. The world of analysis is completely different from anywhere I had explored, the science of continuous variation rather than discontinuous jumping. And since Riemann’s problem is solved by a marriage of the two, although the achievement of a solution cannot quite top what I did in Laws of Form, it runs it a close second, if not an equal first. (0100 hrs 23 06 2007 Saturday)

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 10.07.2020
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Buzz
37,90 CHF *
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'Bees are essential for human survival--one-third of all food on American dining tables depends on the labor of bees. Beyond pollination, the very idea of the bee is ubiquitous in our culture: we can feel buzzed; we can create buzz; we have worker bees, drones, and Queen bees; we establish collectives and even have communities that share a hive-mind. In Buzz, authors Lisa Jean Moore and Mary Kosut convincingly argue that the power of bees goes beyond the food cycle, bees are our mascots, our models, and,unlike any other insect, are both feared and revered. In this fascinating account, Moore and Kosut travel into the land of urban beekeeping in New York City, where raising bees has become all the rage. We follow them as they climb up on rooftops, attendbeekeeping workshops and honey festivals, and even put on full-body beekeeping suits and open up the hives. In the process, we meet a passionate, dedicated, and eclectic group of urban beekeepers who tend to their brood with an emotional and ecological connection that many find restorative and empowering. Kosut and Moore also interview professional beekeepers and many others who tend to their bees for their all-important production of a food staple: honey. The artisanal food shops that are so popular in Brooklyn are a perfect place to sell not just honey, but all manner of goods: soaps, candles, beeswax, beauty products, and even bee pollen. Buzz also examines media representations of bees, such as children's books, films, and consumer culture, bringingto light the reciprocal way in which the bee and our idea of the bee inform one another. Partly an ethnographic investigation and partly a meditation on the very nature of human/insect relations, Moore and Kosut argue that how we define, visualize, and interact with bees clearly reflects our changing social and ecological landscape, pointing to how we conceive of and create culture, and how, in essence, we create ourselves. Lisa Jean Moore is a feminist medical sociologist and Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Purchase College, State University of New York. Mary Kosut is Associate Professor of Media, Society and the Arts at Purchase College, State University of New York. In the Biopolitics series'--

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 10.07.2020
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Meet the Neighbors
72,90 CHF *
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This is a fictional story about a newly-built upscale residential housing development and begins after the developer is turning over the governance of the homeowner association to the owners. They almost all have one thing in common; they are strangers to each other but now attempt to live in harmony under guidelines and rules anchored in what is known as governing documents. Let us Meet the Neighbors Two long time buddies, Karl Wagner and Rudy Gonzales, reunite and are now neighbors. There is Don Barnes who brings his experiences from prior years and volunteers to be active in the Association. Supporting him are people like Lou Tenant, Eileen Dover, Harold Baker, Lon Moore and more who want to maintain the high quality life style in their neighborhood. Yet there are others like Hank Pistola, Jack Cass, Amanda Reckonwith, Boyd Schidt, Mike Rotch, Anita Potty, Lotta Hare and Al Koholic who pursue personal goals and hidden agendas. Bruce Numnutts is trying to change the name of his street because his kids hate the name. Retired Professor Reinhold von Weisenheim lectures young people at local coffee shops to pursue their educational goals, as widower he is being chased by Baroness Brunhilde von Veldhausen. Several sexually dissatisfied housewives are seeking to meet other men and some of them decide to serve on the Board of Directors and Committees. They eventually all wind up becoming lovers of Darrell Bradley, a retired cop who installs home alarm systems. Hans Schneider, a local restaurant and delicatessen owner befriends neighbors and starts a regular Roundtable luncheon sharing fond and funny memories and gossip in the neighborhood to which Darrell Bradley contributes regularly a juicy Stud report. In a humorous way, the reader can enjoy what actually might happen in his or her neighborhood without really knowing about it.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 10.07.2020
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The Disneyization of Society
215,00 CHF *
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`Alan Bryman has expanded on his internationally well-known work on Disney theme parks and Disneyization to create a fascinating and highly readable book. It should prove of interest to beginning students in a number of different courses and fields, as well as to scholars interested in culture and consumption. There is no question that the model created by Disney, and emulated in whole or in part by many organizations and in many settings, will continue to influence social structure and culture well into the future. This is an important book about a significant social process. And, it manages to be a fun read, as well!' - George Ritzer, author of McDonaldization and Professor of Sociology, University of Maryland `Bryman's analysis of contemporay consumption is full of detail and provides a host of examples ranging from restaurants and hotels, to theme parks, zoos and sports stadia. Without doubt students will find it an accessible text, one that should allow them to think about consumption, familiar consumer products, settings and activities, sociologically' - Barry Smart, Professor of Sociology, University of Portsmouth `Bryman's dissection of Disneyization is a timely and significant contribution to the growing literature on Disney. In fact, his excellent analysis of the extension of Disneyization throughout society explains why we should care about the Disney phenomenon at all. This is not only an important book for Disney scholars, but for any one interested in the future of modern society' - Janet Wasko Professor of Communication Studies, University of Oregon This is an agenda-setting new work in the sociology of culture and modern society. It argues that the contemporary world is increasingly converging towards the characteristics of the Disney theme parks. This process of convergence is revealed in: the growing influence of themed environments in settings like restaurants, shops, hotels, tourism and zoos; the growing trend towards social environments that are driven by combinations of forms of consumption: shopping, eating out, gambling, visiting the cinema, watching sports; the growth in cachet awarded to brands based on licensed merchandise; and the increased prominence of work that is a performance in which the employees have to display certain emotions and generally convey impressions as though working in a theatrical event. This insightful book demonstrates the importance of control and surveillance in consumer culture. Of interest to a wide variety of students studying in business, sociology, cultural studies, media studies and leisure studies courses this will also be of interest to anybody interested in understanding the intricacies of modern society.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 10.07.2020
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After the Music Stopped
23,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

New York Times  Bestseller One of our wisest and most clear-eyed economic thinkers offers a masterful narrative of the crisis and its lessons. Many fine books on the financial crisis were first drafts of history—books written to fill the need for immediate understanding. Alan S. Blinder, esteemed Princeton professor,  Wall Street Journal columnist, and former vice chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, held off, taking the time to understand the crisis and to think his way through to a truly comprehensive and coherent narrative of how the worst economic crisis in postwar American history happened, what the government did to fight it, and what we can do from here—mired as we still are in its wreckage. With bracing clarity, Blinder shows us how the U.S. financial system, which had grown far too complex for its own good—and too unregulated for the public good—experienced a perfect storm beginning in 2007. Things started unraveling when the much-chronicled housing bubble burst, but the ensuing implosion of what Blinder calls the “bond bubble” was larger and more devastating. Some people think of the financial industry as a sideshow with little relevance to the real economy—where the jobs, factories, and shops are. But finance is more like the circulatory system of the economic body: if the blood stops flowing, the body goes into cardiac arrest. When America’s financial structure crumbled, the damage proved to be not only deep, but wide. It took the crisis for the world to discover, to its horror, just how truly interconnected—and fragile—the global financial system is. Some observers argue that large global forces were the major culprits of the crisis. Blinder disagrees, arguing that the problem started in the U.S. and was pushed abroad, as complex, opaque, and overrated investment products were exported to a hungry world, which was nearly poisoned by them. The second part of the story explains how American and international government intervention kept us from a total meltdown. Many of the U.S. government’s actions, particularly the Fed’s, were previously unimaginable. And to an amazing—and certainly misunderstood—extent, they worked. The worst did not happen. Blinder offers clear-eyed answers to the questions still before us, even if some of the choices ahead are as divisive as they are unavoidable.  After the Music Stopped is an essential history that we cannot afford to forget, because one thing history teaches is that it will happen again.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 10.07.2020
Zum Angebot